How Much Do E-Bikes Cost?

How Much Do E-Bikes Cost?

E-bikes are actually quite affordable. The price of the electric bike you want to buy will depend largely on the type of riding experience you want and the quality of that experience.



If you’re looking for an electric bike for quick jaunts, you might spend less money than if you need one for extended daily commutes. Need an eBike to go trail riding? Then you’ll have to buy an electric bike with more durable components – stronger frame, fatter tires, more robust motor.



There are many companies out there manufacturing electric bikes now. And each company sets its own prices. As you explore your options, you’ll soon get an idea of what you can expect to pay for an electric bike.

 


But there are other cost considerations with buying an electric bike.

 

Consider the Maintenance Cost



Electric bikes tend wear out just like a traditional bicycle. But they have far more components in them that can wear out. Motor. Battery. Motherboard. If you are going to use this as your main means of transportation, it will need adequate maintenance to last. Here is a quick list of some of the things you need and the cost.



A tune up every six months (or after 500 miles) is recommended. That can cost anywhere between $75 to $100.


Patching a flat tire costs between $10 and $20, depending on the severity of the fix.


Brake adjustments will cost $20-35.

 

Some of our electric bikes use a maintenance-friendly design. Our EB8 features power line quick disconnects, making it easier for bike shops to perform general maintenance.


Since the most common repair is fixing a flat tire, keep the necessary tools and parts so you can do it yourself. Again, this is where our EB8’s quick-disconnects will come in handy. You won’t need to find a special eBike shop with a certified electrician just to change the tires. You can easily do it yourself.

 

Consider the Cost for Charging an E-Bike



One recurring cost associated with electric bikes is the cost of charging the battery. It’s a common question. And it’s one that is easily calculated, if we do a bit of math.



Find the battery voltage and amp hour rating of the eBike. Use those numbers to get watt hours. For example, a 36V 10Ah battery has 360 watt hours, or 0.36 kilowatt hours (kWh).



Check your local electricity prices. Electricity prices vary widely from state to state, but the average cost per kWh in the U.S. today is roughly 13.45 cents per kWh.